1. List the consequentialist concerns that could be given in arguing about whether the actions…

1. List the consequentialist concerns that could be given in
arguing about whether the actions proposed in three of the scenarios in
Question 6 are justified.

2. Respirator Removal. Jim is an active person. He is a
lawyer by profession. When he was forty-four years old, a routine physical
revealed that he had a tumor on his right lung. After surgery to remove that
lung, he returned to a normal life. However, four years later, a cancerous
tumor is found in his other lung. He knows he has only months to live. Then comes
the last hospitalization. He is on a respirator. It is extremely
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1. List the consequentialist concerns that could be given in
arguing about whether the actions proposed in three of the scenarios in
Question 6 are justified.

2. Respirator Removal. Jim is an active person. He is a
lawyer by profession. When he was forty-four years old, a routine physical
revealed that he had a tumor on his right lung. After surgery to remove that
lung, he returned to a normal life. However, four years later, a cancerous
tumor is found in his other lung. He knows he has only months to live. Then comes
the last hospitalization. He is on a respirator. It is extremely uncomfortable
for him, and he is frustrated by not being able to talk because of the tubes.
After some thought, he decides that he does not want to live out his last few
weeks like this and asks to have the respirator removed. Because he is no
longer able to breathe on his own, he knows this means he will die shortly
after it is removed.

Do Jim or the doctors who remove the respirator and then
watch Jim die as a result do anything wrong? Why or why not? Would there be any
difference between this case and that of a person such as Terri Schiavo, who
was in a persistent vegetative state, was not able to express her current
wishes, and had left no written request? Would there be a difference in cases
such as hers between removing a respirator (which she was not using) and
removing a feeding tube? How would you tell whether a respirator or a feeding
tube would be considered an ordinary or extraordinary means of life support?
What would be the significance of these labels in each case?

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