Instructions
Part One: Identifications (10 points each; 200 points total)
This section requires you to write short answers to each identification question. There are 20 identification questions worth 10 points each for 200 points total. Each answer must address who, what, when, where, and why in the identification.
Each answer should be no more than one paragraph in length (4-5 sentences or 100-150 words), double-spaced with 1-inch margins using 12 point Arial, Calibri, or Times New Roman font. You are not required to include citations. Each answer must:

Identify the individual named, author, event, and other key individuals and groups (2 points)
Discuss what the identification term or name is about (2 points)
Describe when it occurred (2 points)
Describe where it occurred (2 points)
Explain why the individual, group, or event is significant for understanding African American Studies (2 points)

Listed below are twenty identification terms you will need to answer in Part One of the exam. You must answer all twenty terms to receive full credit. DO NOT copy and paste language from classroom resources or any other source. This is an act of plagiarism and is a violation of the academic integrity pledge you signed in Week 1.
The twenty identification terms are drawn from Weeks 1-4 of the AASP 201 classroom resources. Please use your class readings first to answer the terms before resorting to outside sources.
1. Jim Crow
2. Segregation
3. Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade
4. Frederick Douglass
5. William Green
6. Ida B. Wells
7. Tuskegee University
8. Black Studies
9. 40 Acres and a Mule
10. KKK
11. Lynching
12.  1619
13. Henry Louis Gates Jr.
14. Life of a Slave Girl
15. Civil War
16. Reconstruction
17. White Supremacists
18. NAACP
19. Niagara Movement
20. Harlem Renaissance
Part Two: Essay (100 points)
You are required to answer one of three essay questions described below. The essay portion must be 4-5 pages in length, double-spaced, numbered, include 1 inch margins, use 12 point Arial, Calibri, or Times New Roman font.
Your essay must include a Works Cited page. The citation style of the Works Cited page may be either Chicago, APA, or MLA. The selected citations must be appropriate to the exam topic and the citations must support the assertions made in the exam.
Your essay will include three main parts—the Thesis/Introduction, Argument, and Conclusion.
The Introduction section should clearly state the thesis within the first 1-2 paragraphs. The thesis must be relevant and appropriate to the argument and demonstrate an accurate and complete understanding of the question. This section should make it clear which question you are answering, but it should do more than restate the question by offering a brief response and it should be free of grammar and spelling errors.
The Argument section (3-4 pages) should incorporate pertinent details from the assigned readings but you may also use outside readings. The section must provide relevant historical evidence to support the thesis and the key claims made in the argument as needed. It should maintain focus and avoid sidetracking. It should present your answer to the question clearly and concisely in an organized manner and it should be free of grammar and spelling errors.
The Conclusion section should be in the last part of your essay exam within the last 1-2 paragraphs. It should briefly restate the thesis and summarize the main points of the argument. It should also demonstrate insight and understanding regarding the question asked and it should be free of grammar and spelling errors.
A scoring rubric for the essay portion is included below. Please answer one of the following essay questions:
1. Examine the impact that slavery had on the lives of enslaved women in America?
2. Interrogate the role of the Harlem Renaissance (1919-1940) on the freedom struggles in America and around the world? 
3. Booker T. Washington believed that practical education was the route to freedom for Black/African people in America. Do you agree or disagree with this assertion?