Demonstrate the concept of DESYNC using the example ring shown in Figure 6.19. The ring has 16…

Demonstrate the concept of DESYNC using the example ring shown in Figure 6.19. The ring has 16 positions [0 … 15], with node A currently in position 0 (the firing position), B in position 14, etc. Every unit of time, each node moves one position clockwise along the ring. The table indicates the positions of the four nodes, including the new distance information that is learned at each firing. Assume that node A has received D’s last firing, indicating a distance of 10 between nodes A and D. In this table, at time 0, node A fires, allowing node B to learn its distance to A (i.e., 2). At time

»Demonstrate the concept of DESYNC using the example ring shown in Figure 6.19. The ring has 16 positions [0 … 15], with node A currently in position 0 (the firing position), B in position 14, etc. Every unit of time, each node moves one position clockwise along the ring. The table indicates the positions of the four nodes, including the new distance information that is learned at each firing. Assume that node A has received D’s last firing, indicating a distance of 10 between nodes A and D. In this table, at time 0, node A fires, allowing node B to learn its distance to A (i.e., 2). At time 1, no node is in the firing position. At time 2, node B fires, allowing node C to learn its distance to node B (i.e., 2). At the same time, node A now knows its distance to node B and its distance to node D. According to the description of the DESYNC algorithm in this chapter, node A can now find the midpoint between nodes B and D and jump to this new location (i.e., 6), which is indicated in the table at time 2. At time 3, again each node moves ahead one position. Continue this table using the DESYNC algorithm until time 19. Compare the average distance between neighboring nodes at time 19 with that of time 0.

»