Determine Average and Peak Loads on a Circuit In this project, you will check the average load and..

Determine Average and Peak Loads on a Circuit

In this project, you will check the average load and the
peak load on a home LAN’s electric circuit and determine if there is any danger
of overloading the circuit.

1. Shut down the LAN and any peripheral equipment connected
on the same circuit.

2. Identify the residence circuit breaker that protects the
LAN circuit. To do this, plug a lamp into the LAN’s surge protector and turn
off one circuit breaker at a time until the lamp goes off. Use the same
procedure to check which other outlets are connected to the LAN circuit.

3. Note the amp
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Determine Average and Peak Loads on a Circuit

In this project, you will check the average load and the
peak load on a home LAN’s electric circuit and determine if there is any danger
of overloading the circuit.

1. Shut down the LAN and any peripheral equipment connected
on the same circuit.

2. Identify the residence circuit breaker that protects the
LAN circuit. To do this, plug a lamp into the LAN’s surge protector and turn
off one circuit breaker at a time until the lamp goes off. Use the same
procedure to check which other outlets are connected to the LAN circuit.

3. Note the amp capacity of the breaker. (It will be a
number embossed on the breaker face or on its switch.) Then, turn the breaker
back on.

 4. Determine the power requirement in watts of each piece
of hardware connected to the LAN circuit. It will be listed on the label of the
hardware in its user’s guide.

5. Add up the total watt requirement of all electrical items
connected to the LAN circuit.

6. Divide the total load in watts by 110 (the voltage of the
circuit) to get the amp load on the circuit; amps equals watts divided by
volts.

 7. If the result of Step 6 is a number larger than the amp
rating of the breaker, the circuit is overloaded. This condition must be
corrected by removing some devices from the circuit.

8. If the calculated load is within the breaker’s amp
rating, check the devices in the circuit to be sure none contain motors or
other components that have higher startup power loads than when running.

9. If you find any, factor their startup load requirements
into the total load calculation and see if the breaker will be temporarily
overloaded when some equipment starts. If it will be, some equipment should be
moved off the circuit.

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