You arrive on the scene and find a 26-year-old patient who is complaining of vomiting up blood. He..

You arrive on the scene and find a
26-year-old patient who is complaining of vomiting up blood. He tells you that
he is an alcoholic and has been drinking for a week or so. He is alert but
sluggish in responding to your questions. His respirations are 22 per minute
with good tidal volume. His radial pulse is 132 bpm and is very weak. His skin
is extremely pale, cool, and clammy. His blood pressure is 86/68 mmHg. He is
complaining of abdominal pain to the epigastric region. The pain has been
present for about 3–4 weeks; however, it has gotten much worse over the last several
days. Today he
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You arrive on the scene and find a
26-year-old patient who is complaining of vomiting up blood. He tells you that
he is an alcoholic and has been drinking for a week or so. He is alert but
sluggish in responding to your questions. His respirations are 22 per minute
with good tidal volume. His radial pulse is 132 bpm and is very weak. His skin
is extremely pale, cool, and clammy. His blood pressure is 86/68 mmHg. He is
complaining of abdominal pain to the epigastric region. The pain has been
present for about 3–4 weeks; however, it has gotten much worse over the last several
days. Today he began to vomit blood. He confirms he has had black, tarry
stools. The pain is a “10” on a 1-to-10 pain scale. Nothing relieves the pain.
The pain worsens after drinking alcohol. He has not eaten for a few days. The
pain is sharp, stabbing, and constant. The pain does not radiate. The patient
denies any allergies and takes no medications.

1. What emergency care would you
provide during the primary assessment? 2. What assessment findings would lead
you to suspect the patient is experiencing an acute abdomen? 3. What are the
vital signs indicating? 4. Based on the assessment findings and history
information, what might the patient be suffering from? 5. What is the
significance of the bowel movement findings?

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