You arrive on the scene and find a 59-year-old male patient complaining of chest discomfort and…

You arrive on the scene and find a
59-year-old male patient complaining of chest discomfort and shortness of
breath. The patient has assumed a tripod position while sitting at the edge of
his bed. You notice that he has four pillows on the side of the bed where he
sleeps. His complexion appears to be ashen gray and he is extremely
diaphoretic. His breathing is very labored, and he speaks two to three words
followed by a gasp for a breath. His radial pulse is present and his skin is
extremely cool and clammy. His heart rate is 134 bpm, blood pressure is 178/100
mmHg, and respirations are 32
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You arrive on the scene and find a
59-year-old male patient complaining of chest discomfort and shortness of
breath. The patient has assumed a tripod position while sitting at the edge of
his bed. You notice that he has four pillows on the side of the bed where he
sleeps. His complexion appears to be ashen gray and he is extremely
diaphoretic. His breathing is very labored, and he speaks two to three words
followed by a gasp for a breath. His radial pulse is present and his skin is
extremely cool and clammy. His heart rate is 134 bpm, blood pressure is 178/100
mmHg, and respirations are 32 per minute and labored. His SpO2 reading is 72%.
He has a history of three previous myocardial infarctions. He has crackles in
the lower and middle lobes of both lungs. His hands and ankles are swollen.

1. What emergency care would you
provide during the primary assessment? 2. What condition do you suspect the
patient is experiencing? 3. What medication may improve the patient’s
condition? 4. How would you move the patient from the second-floor bedroom to
the ambulance stretcher on the first floor? 5. In what position would you
transport the patient? 6. What oxygen device would you apply and at what liter
flow? 7. What is causing the crackles in the lungs?

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